2.en.31 More newspapers and more immigration stories: “The New York Times” “The Guardian” and “El País in English”

So far, we have read and analysed different newspapers and different types of newspaper articles. Do you remember? Here are the links to refresh your memory.

From The Guardian:

From El País in English:

In this post, we’ll go back to the immigration issue. Do you remember the post 1.en.7? It might be a good idea to spend some time revising what we did at the beginning of the first term. So, have a look at post 1.en.27 again.  It will be a good introduction to today’s task. In October we commented an article from El Páis which discussed how the immigration flow towards Spain had decreased. We also looked at an interactive map where you could check migration patterns at word level.

  • This time, we shall look at migration from a different perspective. We’ll use an article that appeared in The New York Times this year. It consists of a first person narrative of 12 immigrants who are living in New York. The article contains pictures. It is  published in a section of the paper that encourages interaction, so you can actually  read many more testimonies from other inmigrants. I would like you to carry out a set of tasks similar  to the ones you did with the You Tube Orchestra videos.  

.

HOMEWORK: 12th December

Task 1

Read again the article : 1.en.7 immigrants or emigrants?use the new worksheet to find out if the headline and the lead are good ones. Write comments in your notebook. 

Task 2:

Use this interactive map to check the number of people who migrate to the USA. (arrivals) aslo compare it with departures. Finaly,  Take note in your notebook. 

Task 3:

Read the article from the New York Times written by Sam Dolnik. Take notes in your notebook. It is a similar exercise to the one you did with the You Tube Orchestra. You mst consider the following aspects.

  1. How long have they been in the USA?
  2. Why did they leave their country?
  3. How old are they?
  4. What is their job?
  5. What did they do in their country of origin?
  6. Do they regret moving to the States?
  7. Do they give any details on their background and family life before they emigrated?
  8. What are their plans for the future?
  9. What is the object they have chosen to keep? 
  10. Why is it valuable for them?
  11. Use the interactive map to check the number of people who emigrate to the USA. Compare with other destinations

Choose the story you liked best and post the comment to the blog. Search the comments made by New York Time readers. Choose another story and post it to the blog.

I’ve  prepared a power point for you using the pics and texts from the New Yoirk Time. I hope you’ll find it helpful.  However, if you prefer to work with the online article, you are certainly welcome to do so. Internal links within the presentation t are not supported on SlideShare, so you will need to move back and forth using the mouse click.

  • Did you like the stories?
  • Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
  • Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
  • Finally , as a follow up activity, read this piece of news from El País.

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35 Respostes to “2.en.31 More newspapers and more immigration stories: “The New York Times” “The Guardian” and “El País in English””

  1. juliamulet Says:

    The Ruth Eiman’s story is that I prefer. I think is very interesting but sad.

    • juliamulet Says:

      I choose this story from a comment posted in the New York Times:
      Planning an extended move to Asia beginning in Hanoi in August 2011, I am currently deciding what to bring, what to leave behind. I have a framed panoramic photo print from Ikea of the New York Skyline including the Brooklyn Bridge and The Twin Towers. It will come with me wherever I go…….

  2. vladis890 Says:

    The stories I liked best are the story of Ruth Heiman and the story of Albert Barawandika.

  3. claramulet Says:

    The story that I liked best is about Ruth Heiman’s move. It breaks my heart, she had a very sad life. Sure she learnt how to superse serious problems and doesn’t surrender. I like this story because it makes me reflect.

  4. claramulet Says:

    I found this story in the comments of the New York Times’ digital page:
    I am a immigrant from Burma, also known as Myanmar. I brought a Buddha statue with me. Having the Buddha makes my compassion and loving kindness growing. I have been living within the Burmese community and working as a social and human rights activist.

  5. izabelaigorova02 Says:

    *The story that I liked best was the stoy of Ruth Heiman. Is a very sad story.

  6. jhazminmarmol Says:

    The story that I liked best was the story of Ruth Heiman because with all that she had to suffer, she live in the present. Is a sad story but worthy of admiration.

  7. merysantos1998 Says:

    Did you like the stories?
    I love all this stories but the story that I found most interesting is the story of Ruth Heiman.

    I looked for the comments and I love this one: Beautiful article. In a world where we dispose of so much, mindlessly and wastefully, it’s good to have something that has been every step of the way in our lives.

    Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    I’m very surprised with the number of immigrants that are in USA specially with the ones that are in NY.

    Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    I’m not familiar with this expression.

    And the video is amazing 😀

  8. marinaescarpa11 Says:

    1-Did you like the stories?
    *Yes, I liked very much that stories like Ruth Heiman and Albert Barawandika stories.
    * I liked very much that sentence that said Ruth Heiman: “All my life until now I tried to push the past put of my mind, I live in the present but there are certain things that you don’t give up”
    2-Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    *Yes, I’m surprised about the number of inhabitants that has New york city.
    3-Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    *No, I’m not familiar with that expression.

  9. isidelatorre Says:

    I choose the Gendis Trabera story because I think that is very beautiful, is about a Diminican girl’s toy, is a bear, and she calls ”Peluchito” She speaks to him like a person.

    1-Did you like the stories?
    *Yes, I liked

    2-Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York? *Yes, I’m surprised about the number of inhabitants that has New york city.

    3-Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    *No, I’m not familiar with that expression.

  10. isidelatorre Says:

    I found this story in the comments of the New York Times’ digital page:

    I came from Cuba at the end of 1960, just before the start of the Peter
    Pan Flights that brought thousands of Cuban kids to the United States. The restrictions imposed by the Castro regime on the lucky few with exit visas prevented me from taking much. In fact, the limit was $5 per person and a single suitcase. My cardboard suitcase was big enough to carry some clothing that would allow me to live in Minneapolis in the winter of that year. The only memento of that journey I still have and treasure is a copy of Shakespeare’s Hamlet – in a bilingual edition – with my Mother’s dedication on the frontispiece and some handwritten notes in pencil. The love of great literature – and Shakespeare in particular – and the love of my parents, who encouraged me in a career in the arts is symbollicaly contained in that book.

  11. vladis890 Says:

    I found this story:

    I am an expat American living in Italy. I left San Diego twelve years ago with my four-year-old cat, Mary, a suitcase of clothes and a wonderful raincoat and scarf my sister gave me as a going away present. The coat lasted until last year, I lost the scarf in a taxi in Bologna when I was writing a story on the Leonard Bernstein School of Musical Theatre for the Italy Daily section of the International Herald Tribune and, sadly, Mary died of cancer in May of 2009. She was my last ‘physical’ connection to my American life and I passed a few days of feeling very disconnected from my Italian life (‘No one here truly KNOWS me, nor, understands where I came from, now that Mary is gone!’). The only thing I still have are a few photos-I threw away all of the rest when I came, saving only one photo of every person I love! The hardest things to part with were books-the rest was easy to leave for a new life.

  12. tonitorner Says:

    The two stories I liked best are Thein Hyint and Albarawandika’s stories. The first one is very sad and the second is an example of hope.

    I also found this story in the coments of the New York Times:
    I am an expat American living in Italy. I left San Diego twelve years ago with my four-year-old cat, Mary, a suitcase of clothes and a wonderful raincoat and scarf my sister gave me as a going away present. The coat lasted until last year, I lost the scarf in a taxi in Bologna when I was writing a story on the Leonard Bernstein School of Musical Theatre for the Italy Daily section of the International Herald Tribune and, sadly, Mary died of cancer in May of 2009. She was my last ‘physical’ connection to my American life and I passed a few days of feeling very disconnected from my Italian life (‘No one here truly KNOWS me, nor, understands where I came from, now that Mary is gone!’). The only thing I still have are a few photos-I threw away all of the rest when I came, saving only one photo of every person I love! The hardest things to part with were books-the rest was easy to leave for a new life.

    Did you like the stories?
    Yes, I like the stories, but especially the two that I comment
    Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    No, I knew that in New York lives a lot of people of different natinalities
    Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No, I have never heard this expression.

  13. janpacha100 Says:

    The story that i like best is the one for Ruth Heiman

    I came from Cuba at the end of 1960, just before the start of the Peter
    Pan Flights that brought thousands of Cuban kids to the United States. The restrictions imposed by the Castro regime on the lucky few with exit visas prevented me from taking much. In fact, the limit was $5 per person and a single suitcase. My cardboard suitcase was big enough to carry some clothing that would allow me to live in Minneapolis in the winter of that year. The only memento of that journey I still have and treasure is a copy of Shakespeare’s Hamlet – in a bilingual edition – with my Mother’s dedication on the frontispiece and some handwritten notes in pencil. The love of great literature – and Shakespeare in particular – and the love of my parents, who encouraged me in a career in the arts is symbollicaly contained in that book.

    Did you like the stories?
    Yes
    Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    No, I know that in New York lives a lot of people of different natinalities
    Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No, never heard this expression.

  14. martitaserra28 Says:

    My favourite story is the Story of Ruth Heiman because I think it is amazing and beautiful but sad. It contains love and drama.

    I found this story:
    Every year, right before my final exams, my father would buy me a fountain pen. When my father first bought that pen for me in the 1980s, I thought he was just being sure that I had another pen to finish my exams with, in case I ran out of ink or my nib broke. But it was a lot more: it was a father’s love and devotion for a child, for whom he could do so much for. The tradition folioed into medical school (in India). When I told my father I was taking my internal medicine boards (after having finished my Internal medicine residency), he gave my a beautiful green fountain pen. I could break his heart by telling him him that the exams were computer based. I cant find my pen after these 5 years and i curse myself for it. That pen stood in a ‘grand canyon’ mug for a long time: It gave me love and strength.
    Thank you Dad and Thank you America! I would die for you today.

    1-Did you like the stories?
    Yes, I like all the stories.
    2-Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    Yes, I am.
    3-Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No. I’m not.

  15. andreafr98 Says:

    *I choose the Ruth Heiman story, because I think that she is a brave person because she suffered much but she continue and look to the present.
    1.-Did you like the stories?
    Yes,I like, but some of them are very sad.
    2.-Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    Yes,I’m surprised by the number of immigrants that live in NY.
    3.-Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No, Im not familiar with this expression.

  16. margaabauza Says:

    My favourite story us the story of Jessica Lane because i think is very interesting.

    I found this story:
    I came to the United States at the age of seven in 1966. My family and I were able to bring only clothes. We had escaped from a country that supported a brutal dictatorship. All family mementos were left behind and lost to us for ever. I love and will always be grateful for the United States.

    1-Did you like the stories?
    Yes, I like the stories.
    2-Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    Yes, I am.
    3-Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No, I’m not.

  17. vidalsiquierj Says:

    ·The best history is from Ruth.
    1.I like the stories.
    2.Yes, I’m surprised.
    3. No,l I’m not familiar with this expression.

  18. tomasgolomb Says:

    I like the history of the Huan Zheng.

    I choose this history:
    When we arrrived here by ship on June 13, 1955 from Rome, Itlay , we came as a family of nine people (parents and 7 children). We were called the Lucky Seven and got our picture in one of the NY papers. My mother brought with her most of her furniture and many pieces of crystals and silver that were family heirlooms also most of my grandfathers paintings (he was an artist by trade)and two huge sweater making machines. We knew no one here and moved into a four room very modest apt in Brooklyn surrounded by all these wonderful family treasures and the machines. My parents had great dreams and I think were a little shocked to find that life was hard here also. The machines were never used but the wonderful thing about being surrounded by all they brought with them, was that it gave us a great sense of pride and love for our culture and each other. We still treasure them what they brought with them minus the machines.

    • tomasgolomb Says:

      Did you like the stories?
      Yes, I like
      Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
      Yes, I’m surprised.
      Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
      No, never heard this expression.

  19. jospomar Says:

    Did you like the stories?
    Yes.
    Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    Yes because they are a lot.
    Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No i wasn’t.
    The story I liked best is the one aboutof Ruth Heiman.

  20. miquelbv9 Says:

    The story that I like most is the last one of the olther women.

    I found this story on the coments:
    My husband and I were married in 1961 in the Netherlands. He had come to New York in 1959 as a Dutch immigrant. When I left Holland in August 1961 to come to New York my mother gave me a small package at the airport and told me not to open it until I was on the plane. In the box was a gold bracelet with aquamarine stones and matching ring that my father had given her in 1950. He died in 1951. These very precious items were stolen from me in 1976 while living in Danville, CA. To this day I think of it and will never forgive the low life who stole it from me.

    1.Did you like the stories?
    Yes, I did.
    2.Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    Yes, I am.
    3.Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No.

  21. ariadnaoliver Says:

    ·I liked all the stories but I was excited the story of Ruth Heiman. It’s a fascinating story and I think is a very brave woman and a fighter. Among the comments of the news, had some very interesting, but this is what I liked:
    -I have to note that my great grandfathers and grandfather, when they came to this country from Ireland in the late 1890s and early 1900s, must have brought *something* with them, but they didn’t pass it on. There is not one thing from them. Not a single thing. Not even a photo — all the photographs were taken after they arrived in Canada or the United States. I always found that sort of sad.
    My children’s father, who came to this country in 1986, had spent 9 years in the Soviet GULAG — he was a political prisoner. He was released from prison through the interventions of American peace activists in the Gorbachev era, and quickly forced to leave the country. He had hardly any time to pack anything and little would have been allowed to take in any event. He arrived in the U.S. with the help of the International Organization for Migration with only a small flight bag. He was also carrying a small toothbrush he had kept in labor camp, one of the few personal possessions. In order to have it fit in the pocket of a camp uniform and not be seen and confiscated, it had to be sawed off and honed down. So it’s a short sort of “travel” toothbrush carefully polished at the end. We still keep it in a drawer.

    •Did you like the stories?
    Yes, I think that there are amazing and very interesting
    •Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    Yes, there a lot and all around the world.
    •Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No, I do not know

  22. ariadnabalufo Says:

    My favourite story is the one of Ruth Heiman I think is very beautifull.

    I found this story:
    I am a third generation immigrant. My dad came from Germany to the US in 1938 with only a Leica camera, bringing it to sell. A generation later, in 1971, my husband and I drove a rented truck with all our possessions from New York to Montreal, including a new-to-us stove and fridge that were a gift from a friend in Queens.
    But what I remember most is what my Aunt Gerda brought our family when she and her husband and their five children came from Germany to the USA in 1954. It was scary for them, they were refugees sponsored by my dad and the local church, and in spite of all these careful arrangements the older children remember being bombed by the allies and were worried about coming to live here! They only had a few things but brought us a gift, new set of wooden painted angel musicians, a little orchestra with its own angel conductor. I still have it and every christmas I put it on the roof of the stable of my creche.

  23. ariadnabalufo Says:

    Correction:
    Beautifull= beautiful

    -Did you like the stories?
    Yes, I think there are very interesting
    -Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    Yes, I am
    -Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No, I don’t know

  24. psocies Says:

    1-Did you like the stories?
    -Yes, I liked, i like the story of Ruth.
    2-Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    -Yes, I’m surprised
    3-Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    *No, I’m not familiar

  25. noesanzu Says:

    The story that I liked most was the story of Ruth Heiman, because it impressed me.

    I found this comment interesting, because it is a little sad:
    My husband and I were married in 1961 in the Netherlands. He had come to New York in 1959 as a Dutch immigrant. When I left Holland in August 1961 to come to New York my mother gave me a small package at the airport and told me not to open it until I was on the plane. In the box was a gold bracelet with aquamarine stones and matching ring that my father had given her in 1950. He died in 1951. These very precious items were stolen from me in 1976 while living in Danville, CA. To this day I think of it and will never forgive the low life who stole it from me.

    * Did you like the stories?
    – Someones.
    * Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    – No, because also my parents immigrated to New York in 1986 and they met in NYC, in 1989.
    * Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    -No, I was not familiar with this expression, but now I understand it.
    * Finally , as a follow up activity, read this piece of news from El País.
    -Ok.

  26. paulinguigs Says:

    Did you like the stories?
    Yes, I did. The story I liked most was the Ruth’s one.
    Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    Yes, I am.
    Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    No, I wasn’t but the translation is:
    Melting pot: figurative (fusion of cultures and nationalities) crisol nm. New York city was a cultural melting pot in the nineteenth century, with immigrants coming from all over Europe.

    • paulinguigs Says:

      I found this story:
      I came in 1981, at the age of 21,I came to the US to go to graduate school at Stanford, the stereotypical Indian engineer, except perhaps for my gender. I brought with me a royal blue and parrot green sari, the first sari my dad bought me when I was 16 years old and leaving home for college. Lots of memories were already wrapped up in that sari when I left India, and lots more are entwined in it now. It’s worn out in places, and I darn it very carefully every couple of months, the only thing I actually take time to darn, especially since dad died a little while ago and he and I had made a special trip to buy it, 34 years ago. At that time, in India, it was weird for a father to accompany his daughter to a sari store, but I was daddy’s girl and that’s what we wanted to do, and that’s what we did. My mom thought it an extravagant purchase, and it was.

      I recently wore it when my mother came visiting. Mom had a blue silk sari with her, so my American-born daughters and I ran around trying to come up with compatible colors, and of course, I wore my blue-and-green. When my sister saw the pictures, she said she wasn’t the least bit surprised at my choice.

  27. sergiomr226 Says:

    * I liked the story of Huan Zheng, that is about a metronome. I found this because I like the music.
    * I liked the story of Genedaris Tavera, that is about a toy that her grandmother gave her. I found this because is a little bit interesting.
    __________________________________________________________________________________________

    ANOTHER STORY: (RatnaHouston, Texas February \ 28th, 2011)

    – I came in 1981, at the age of 21,I came to the US to go to graduate school at Stanford, the stereotypical Indian engineer, except perhaps for my gender. I brought with me a royal blue and parrot green sari, the first sari my dad bought me when I was 16 years old and leaving home for college. Lots of memories were already wrapped up in that sari when I left India, and lots more are entwined in it now. It’s worn out in places, and I darn it very carefully every couple of months, the only thing I actually take time to darn, especially since dad died a little while ago and he and I had made a special trip to buy it, 34 years ago. At that time, in India, it was weird for a father to accompany his daughter to a sari store, but I was daddy’s girl and that’s what we wanted to do, and that’s what we did. My mom thought it an extravagant purchase, and it was.

    I recently wore it when my mother came visiting. Mom had a blue silk sari with her, so my American-born daughters and I ran around trying to come up with compatible colors, and of course, I wore my blue-and-green. When my sister saw the pictures, she said she wasn’t the least bit surprised at my choice.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________________

    1.- Did you like the stories?
    – Some of the stoiries I liked, but another stories I didn’t like.

    2.- Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    – Yes, I am surprised.

    3.- Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    – No, I am not familiar with this expression.

  28. gorandimitrovavramov Says:

    I founded this story on the comments:
    Have to note that my great grandfathers and grandfather, when they came to this country from Ireland in the late 1890s and early 1900s, must have brought *something* with them, but they didn’t pass it on. There is not one thing from them. Not a single thing. Not even a photo — all the photographs were taken after they arrived in Canada or the United States. I always found that sort of sad.

    My children’s father, who came to this country in 1986, had spent 9 years in the Soviet GULAG — he was a political prisoner. He was released from prison through the interventions of American peace activists in the Gorbachev era, and quickly forced to leave the country. He had hardly any time to pack anything and little would have been allowed to take in any event. He arrived in the U.S. with the help of the International Organization for Migration with only a small flight bag. He was also carrying a small toothbrush he had kept in labor camp, one of the few personal possessions. In order to have it fit in the pocket of a camp uniform and not be seen and confiscated, it had to be sawed off and honed down. So it’s a short sort of “travel” toothbrush carefully polished at the end. We still keep it in a drawer.

  29. marinabarcenas Says:

    The two stories that I liked more are:
    ·Luz Andriana Villegas
    ·Albert Barabandika

    1.Did you like the stories?
    – Not very much

    2.Are you surprised by the number of immigrants that live in New York?
    – Yes, I’m suprised

    3.Are you familiar with the expression “the melting pot”?
    – No

  30. 2.en.35 The Melting Pot, Cultural Mosaic, Multiculturalism « saps què te dic 2 Says:

    […] 2.en.31 More newspapers and more immigration stories: “The New York Times” “The Gu… […]

    • Christiana Says:

      profeta do profano:Já notou que o que você falou serviria exatamente no sentido oposto (sobre um religioso que virou ateu)? Depende de quem o está pr2r0findo&#8o3e; interessante ,né?


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